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Body-on-a-chip simulation with gastrointestinal tract and liver tissues suggests that ingested nanoparticles have the potential to cause liver injury

Overview of attention for article published in Lab on a Chip - Miniaturisation for Chemistry & Biology, June 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#26 of 2,174)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
9 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
8 tweeters
weibo
1 weibo user
facebook
2 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Readers on

mendeley
89 Mendeley
Title
Body-on-a-chip simulation with gastrointestinal tract and liver tissues suggests that ingested nanoparticles have the potential to cause liver injury
Published in
Lab on a Chip - Miniaturisation for Chemistry & Biology, June 2014
DOI 10.1039/c4lc00371c
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mandy B. Esch, Gretchen J. Mahler, Tracy Stokol, Michael L. Shuler, Esch MB, Mahler GJ, Stokol T, Shuler ML

Abstract

The use of nanoparticles in medical applications is highly anticipated, and at the same time little is known about how these nanoparticles affect human tissues. Here we have simulated the oral uptake of 50 nm carboxylated polystyrene nanoparticles with a microscale body-on-a-chip system (also referred to as multi-tissue microphysiological system or micro Cell Culture Analog). Using the 'GI tract-liver-other tissues' system allowed us to observe compounding effects and detect liver tissue injury at lower nanoparticle concentrations than was expected from experiments with single tissues. To construct this system, we combined in vitro models of the human intestinal epithelium, represented by a co-culture of enterocytes (Caco-2) and mucin-producing cells (TH29-MTX), and the liver, represented by HepG2/C3A cells, within one microfluidic device. The device also contained chambers that together represented the liquid portions of all other organs of the human body. Measuring the transport of 50 nm carboxylated polystyrene nanoparticles across the Caco-2/HT29-MTX co-culture, we found that this multi-cell layer presents an effective barrier to 90.5 ± 2.9% of the nanoparticles. Further, our simulation suggests that a larger fraction of the 9.5 ± 2.9% nanoparticles that travelled across the Caco-2/HT29-MTX cell layer were not large nanoparticle aggregates, but primarily single nanoparticles and small aggregates. After crossing the GI tract epithelium, nanoparticles that were administered in high doses estimated in terms of possible daily human consumption (240 and 480 × 10(11) nanoparticles mL(-1)) induced the release of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), an intracellular enzyme of the liver that indicates liver cell injury. Our results indicate that body-on-a-chip devices are highly relevant in vitro models for evaluating nanoparticle interactions with human tissues.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 89 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 4%
France 2 2%
Germany 1 1%
Italy 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
Unknown 80 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 30 34%
Researcher 18 20%
Student > Master 13 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 8%
Student > Bachelor 6 7%
Other 15 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 31 35%
Engineering 22 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 8%
Chemistry 5 6%
Unspecified 5 6%
Other 19 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 76. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 August 2014.
All research outputs
#108,676
of 7,994,338 outputs
Outputs from Lab on a Chip - Miniaturisation for Chemistry & Biology
#26
of 2,174 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,043
of 176,784 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Lab on a Chip - Miniaturisation for Chemistry & Biology
#5
of 155 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,994,338 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,174 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 176,784 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 155 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.